Two Nigerians, On Somali three of four high school students accepted to ALL US EIGHT Ivy - CVIEW NEWS

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Thursday, 9 April 2015

Two Nigerians, On Somali three of four high school students accepted to ALL US EIGHT Ivy



The high-achieving high schoolers have each been accepted to all eight Ivy League schools: Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Yale University.
And as well as the Ivy League colleges, each of them has also been accepted to other top schools.
While they all grew up in different cities, the students are the offspring of immigrant parents who moved to America – from Bulgaria, Somalia or Nigeria.
And all four – Munira Khalif from Minnesota, Stefan Stoykov from Indiana, Victor Agbafe from North Carolina, and Harold Ekeh from New York – say they have their parents’ hard work to thank.

  • Munira Khalif from Minnesota, Stefan Stoykov from Indiana, Victor Agbafe from North Carolina, and Harold Ekeh from New York got multiple offers
  • All have immigrant parents – from Somalia, Bulgaria or Nigeria – and say they have their parents’ hard work to thank for their successes
  • They hope to use the opportunities for good, from improving education across the world to becoming neurosurgeons

Now they hope to use the opportunities for good – whether its effecting positive social change, improving education across the world or becoming a neurosurgeon.
The teens have one more thing in common: they don’t know which school they’re going to pick yet.
The daughter of Somali immigrants who has already received a U.N. award and wants to improve education across the world
Star pupil: Munira Khalif, from St. Paul, Minnesota, says she has always been driven by the thought that her parents, who left Somalia during the civil war, fled to the U.S. so she would have better opportunities
Munira Khalif, who attends Mounds Park Academy in St. Paul, Minnesota, was shocked when she was accepted by eight Ivy Schools and three others – but her teachers were not.
‘She is composed and she is just articulate all the time,’ Randy Comfort, an upper school director at the private school, told KMSP. ‘She’s pretty remarkable.’
The 18-year-old student, whose parents both fled Somali during the civil war, she said she was inspired to work hard because of the opportunities her family and the U.S. had given her.
‘The thing is, when you come here as an immigrant, you’re hoping to have opportunities not only for yourself, but for your kids,’ she told the channel. ‘And that’s always been at the back of my mind.’
As well as achieving top grades, Khalif has immersed herself in other activities both in and out of school – particularly those aimed at doing good.
She was one of nine youngsters in the world to receive the UN Special Envoy for Global Education’s Youth Courage Award for her education activism, which she started when she was just 13.
High achiever: She was one of nine youngsters in the world to receive the UN Special Envoy for Global Education’s Youth Courage Award for her education activism, which she started when she was just 13
She launched a non-profit group, Lighting the Way, to make education more accessible for East African youth, especially girls, through scholarships, libraries and improving sanitation issues.
And she was also appointed as A World at School Global Youth Ambassador to promote universal education.
Khalif, who plans to study political science at college, said she has yet to decide where to go and plans to visit a few more campuses before she makes her final decision.
As well as the Ivy League schools, she also received offers from Stanford, Georgetown and the University of Minnesota – and she’s still letting the realization sink in.
‘I was very surprised,’ she said. ‘I am humbled to even have the opportunity to choose amongst these schools because they are all incredible places to learn and grow.’
The Bulgarian housekeeper’s son who couldn’t speak English a decade before he was accepted to 18 top schools in the U.S.









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